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WOW, what a change!

Australia has been ravaged by fires for months and anyone has followed me for a while knows that I go along and take photos from the roof of my house.

The other day I captured this photo and while it’s not the most amazing photo you will ever see it did make think and understand the power of photography.

This photo to me represents the idea that we are back to a normal, normal before fires and a normal before the summer heat. Sitting in my roof taking this photo took them back to many places and many times I’ve had on my roof with friends and family enjoying the scenery.

I guess the point I’m getting at here is that photography and photographs capture a point in time and they capture an emotion in time. For me looking at this view brings back feelings of friendship, love and well-being.

What feelings do your photos bring back to you?

New Life

With every dark night, there is a sunny day. With every sad day, there is a day of happiness. With every broken heart, there is love. With every great photo, there are 8,498,094 shit ones. hahahahaha

The amazing thing about the Australian bushland is that it has the ability to rebuild after fires and in fact a lot of our flora require it.

Walking through the burnt lands and national parks what was amazing was how fast some of the plants have not only survived but even after being completely burnt have comeback.

What you will notice in these photos is that the leaves and grass have also come back and these photos were taken maybe 3 weeks after the fire has passed through this area.

Ferns coming back after the 2020 bushfires

I saw hundreds of ferns that have at least 30cm of new growth and littered the hills of the burnt-out wasteland where I would have thought all life would have been extinguished just like the fires had.

Tree coming back after the 2020 bushfires
Ferns coming back after the 2020 bushfires
Ferns coming back after the 2020 bushfires
Ferns coming back after the 2020 bushfires

They Are Here To Kill, You Need To Help!

The bushfires across Australia have wiped out a shit load of our bush but what is worse than the trees is the wildlife that has been either killed or wiped off the face of the earth in many areas.

Any animals that did survive the bushfires had either run away from it, hid while it passed or doubled back on the fire as it burnt. As you can imagine any animal going back into the burnt fire ground there would be slim pickings in regards to food and what is worse for a lot of animals they rely on the cover of the bush to hide from feral animals, like foxes, cats and dogs.

Spending a few days in the burnt landscape I only saw one wallaby that was jumping through the grounds for what I could only imagine was in a hunt for food.

Driving down one of the roads we came across a feral dog that was walking along the road, the dog looked like it hadn’t eaten in weeks given the exposure of the hips and ribs, not to mention it was keen to travel the roads and come up to cars looking for food.

While the dog was in distress what crossed my mind was the image of the wallaby and all the other vulnerable animals coming back into these areas where these predators would be waiting.

What can you do to help to protect our vulnerable wildlife while it tries to recover?

I guess the first thing I would say it so keep any of your pets inside so they do not venture out into these areas for an easy feed.

The other idea I would think is that if you do see these feral animals in vulnerable areas that you contact the national parks wildlife service to let them know so they can deal with, or if you are licenced to do so, take some time over the coming month to go to these area and concentrate on ferals that are taking advantage of our vulnerable wildlife.

Feral Dog looking for prey after the Australian Bushfires
Feral Dog looking for prey after the Australian Bushfires

Total Destruction and Houses Saved

Spending a few days travelling up and down the bush fire-ravaged area of the Australian south coast of New South Wales sprinkle some money it was hard to not be freaked out by the destruction the fires have had in that part of the Australian, where I am sure it a scene that has been replicated all over Australian bushfires in the last few months.

There is kilometre after kilometre of burnt national parks, reserves, and farmland.  In some places the destruction is so bad that there is nothing left on the ground, the bushes that may have been there before the fires are completely gone and so is any ash from which they would have ultimately turned into. 

The landscape in some parts looks like the back of a balding echidna, with what were once filled with healthy trees and bush, it now looks like quills that are also so sparse that you can clearly see the landscape they once protected. 

Stopping at one place to have a look around, what struck me was the complete silence.   There were no sounds….  Like none….  No birds, no wind, no leaves, not anything… like there was nothing…  It was both surreal and relaxing at the same time.

The other thing that I took away from looking at hundreds of kilometres of burnt-out land was the incredibly high percentage of houses that survived even while everything was burnt around them.  Their fences were gone, gates were gone, trees around them were gone but the houses looked untouched.  House after house, as I drove up and down the south coast, was like this.  With everyone I saw it was hard to figure out how they were not touched, I know the RFS would have been there for some and residents were there for others but I am sure good old fashion good luck played a very valuable role for most.

Some, on the other hand, was not that lucky.

Aerial view of a house and property that was destroyed in the 2020 bush fires near Nowra
Aerial view of a house and property that was destroyed in the 2020 bush fires near Nowra
The landscape is just sticks after the bushfire
The landscape is just sticks after the bushfire
A burnt-out car on a property surrounded by national park
A burnt-out car on a property surrounded by national park
A burnt-out boat next to a shed on a property that was destroyed by the bushfires
A burnt-out boat next to a shed on a property that was destroyed by the bushfires
A sign marking the T intersection that has seen better times after the bushfires
A sign marking the T intersection that has seen better times after the bushfires
No that is not a tank but an expensive burnt-out boat from the bushfires
No that is not a tank but an expensive burnt-out boat.
burnt-t car from the 2020 bushfires
At least the headlights sort of made it through
Kilometre after kilometre of bushfire ravaged national parks
Kilometre after kilometre of bushfire ravaged national parks
Jerrawangala National Park sign that was burnt in the 2020 bushfires
Maybe not the best national park to visit at this moment in time.

The Fires Are Out!!! Ok Some Of Them

Looks like my predictive rainbow for my previous post seem to be correct, as the rains did come and they come hard and constant.

Since my rainbow photo and the following rains, NSW rural fire service has been able to extinguish:

  • Gospers Mounting – Hawkesbury
  • Myall Creek Road – Richmond Vallery
  • Erskine Creek – Blue Mountains
  • Kerry Ridge – Muswellbrook
  • Green Wattle Creek – Wollondilly
  • Morton – Wingecarribee
  • Currowan – Shoalhaven

These fires equated to a total of over 1.5 million hectares of land burnt, so to have the out is a huge relief.

I spend the weekend down on the south coast to not only sprinkle some money into these communities but also capture the recovery of the native bushland and see first hand and document some of the destruction that it has caused.

To have rain so heavy that we couldn’t see the road was freaking amazing!!! The roads were flooded and where there were dry creeks the day before, now there were rivers overflowing with liquid gold. Truly was an amazing transformation over 24 hours. Where I was we had over 130mm of rain in the 24 hours, so you can understand how that was able to full almost any dam that was previously empty.

Let’s just hope the rain continues and gets out west where it is really needed for people to survive.

Main Street of Ulladulla as the fire stopping rains fall
Main Street of Ulladulla as the fire stopping rains fall

Looking After The Animals

Wondering around the fire zones and around the suburbs one thing that sticks out from the norm, is our need and want to care for our native animals.

From people putting buckets and tubs out behind their houses to what I saw today deep in the fire ravaged area.

From a distance it seemed weird that a plastic bottle had survived the fire but on closer inspection it was in fact a home made bird feeding station.

It was filled with seed and had some holes in the bottom so as to slowly release the seed and from what I could tell is that it was working as there was no sigh of seed on the ground.

For me it really shows how compassionate some of us can be and there should be more of it.

I’m interested to know what are the things you are seeing in your area to support our wildlife through this bush fire crisis?

DIY bush fire bird feeder

Now That’s HOT!

Got the opportunity before the bushfires to photograph what is a great looking motorcycle. A Yamaha R1!!

These bikes are just weapons on two wheels, the have the speed and agility to go from zero to stupid speeds in less time it has taken you to read this line.

They really are one of the top bikes in the supersport category.

The day I look this here in Canberra we had smoke all over the place and we were rated one of the worst places in the world for air quality due to the bushfires that have been burning up this country. I must say the smoke in the background of the shot is something I couldn’t pay for as its just freaking amazing. It adds that extra to the image and with the short depth of field it really brings your eyes to the R1, which is hard to believe you would look anywhere else but hey that photography right?

Yamaha R1 in the bushfire smoke around Canberra
Yamaha R1 in the bushfire smoke around Canberra

Backburning on the range

Looking out across the valley and into the hills where they are doing back burning the image is outstanding.

The image is also kind of a trick, what I mean by that is that the compression of a super long lens has brought the hills close to the houses when fact it is actually at least 10 km away, compression of the super-telephoto lenses is one of those things which can use all sorts of situations we want to bring the background into the foreground and give that impression that they are close.

It is something that is used a lot to give that deeper feel to the image. It also means that if you do have a long lens chances are that no one else can take a photo like yours as a super long lens, especially quality lenses cost a bomb but when you use them they worth every cent.

CANBERRA ACT, AUSTRALIA -February 6th 2020: Backburning on the hills around Tidbinbilla as seen from the South Canberra Suburbs of Conder

It’s A Sign

I would say that I am not really a believer of a higher being however there are times when you just have to sit back and think “Is the universe trying to tell me something??”

And this photo was one of those times!!

To give some of my rural friends some situational awareness of the fires, I once again popped up to the top of one of their hills to capture the fires.

Shooting away for about 15 minutes light rain started to fall. I could feel the cool water on my face and all I could think of was “I hope this continues and hits the firefront”.

Turning around the most amazing rainbow appeared, and not only was it amazing cause of the clarity but it was a complete rainbow, and parts were a DOUBLE RAINBOW that seems to look like a shield protecting Canberra.

The left end of the started over the Canberra city just near Black Mountain and ended over the southern suburbs of Canberra, like Banks, Conder and Gordon.

I am not sure about you but for me looking at this, it gave me a sense of protection and with heavy rains forecast to fall across Australia, I think it was a sign from mother nature to say “I’ve got this and everything is going to OK!”

Mothers Natures way of saying “We are going to be OK”

Two Sides To The Orroral Fire

As the fires rage through the country we all look to the authorities to keep us up to date, informed and safe.

As mentioned in my previous post I have been volunteering as part of a fireteam helping to defend rural properties, this also means I have exclusive access to these rural properties that are currently under threat in the Southern areas of the ACT (Australian Capital Tettoriy).

Just like 99% of every Australian, I am by no means an expert on fire activity and movements, nor do I have any idea of how to really tackle such an enormous job of controlling, steering and eventually extinguishing these fires. What I do know I have the ability to use the equipment I have at hand to get visuals of the firefront and its movements as it crawls along with the mountain ranges like the snowline melting after the winter.

I have at my home a great view of the eastern side of the fires and a northerly view from the farms. Capturing, watching and reporting these fires out to people that are in their path has allowed me to keep these people informed so they can make the right decisions but the side effect of taking photos so they can see what the fire is doing, is that I do get to take some incredible photos and the ones sit at the top of the pile are the sunsets.

Here is just one of them.

In the photo below you can see to the left half has the fire in the hills while the right after is yet untouched.

As I look at this image I can see and feel the destruction the fire has had on the impacted areas. I look and wait knowing it will pass to the other side bringing with it a renewed pressure to bring this fire under control.

The other interesting this about this image is the cloud formations above the fire ground on the left of the image to the clouds in the yet untouched areas.

To me, it looks like the heat of the fires have pushed the clouds up where on the right the cloud cover is flat. I’m a sure someone much much smarter than I that can tell me if what I am seeing is actually what is happening here. 🙂

For the locals some more details in the photo:

From left to right, you can see the firefront moving as it snakes its way from the Tharwa village towards the Corin forest area and then onto Tidbinbilla. Mount Tennent is out of shot to the left, while the valley to the left of the hill in the middle is the Corin Road and the hills in the far right is the Tidbinbilla nature reserve and the Brindabella Ranges.

On the right is the untouched bush and on the left is the out of control  Orroral Fire
On the right is the untouched bush and on the left is the out of control Orroral Fire

Fires Rage Across Canberra

For anyone that doesn’t live in Australia, this country has been under attack from bush fires for almost 3 months.

They have burnt more forests than you could ever believe and as I type they continue to burn and all across the country.

Here in Canberra where I live we have up until the last few weeks have been immune to the rages of this years bush fire season however given that everything is burning around us it was a ticking time bomb.

And it was our turn. The fires have take out most of the Namadgi National Park and have come close the the urban fringes of Canberra.

People all across this country have been out helping others be it through boots on the ground fire protection, donations, supplies, putting people up in houses or emotional support.

Having been one of those people trying to help from afar and feeling very powerless to assist as the fires come closer to Canberra, I like many others put out the offer off assistance.

For me, that takes shape in helping rural landholder mates and others to understand the fires but also be part of their active fire team to defend their properties when and if the fire reaches their boundaries.

The other part of this is to be able to photograph the fire as it moved and shaped around the landscape, allowing them to understand fire moments and when they might be impacted.

In helping these farmers it also gives me exclusive access to view points that most of the public is not allowed as the entire rural south of Canberra has been blocked due to safety concerns.

I have a few different photos of the fires that are happening as I type but I wanted to share this photo with you as it seemed so comforting watching it move and shape its way around the hill that it is hard to remember the death that this fire is bringing to the landscape and the native wildlife.

For the locals this photo was taken the night of the 2rnd of February 2020 from Tharwa facing the fire that was moving on the north side of the fire and into Corin dam.

Talking with the locals that have both lived in the area for many decades and have been in the fire service for many decades they say the risk of this northward moving fire has the potential of moving from the rural landscape into the urban interface and causing loss of houses and property.

Will that come true, who knows but what I can say, sitting back and watching this fire at night and from a distance has given me a new found respect for the fire but also the beauty that it brings, though things like the night fires but also the rejuvenation of life with the bush land after the fire.

Right now the night time allows us to take stock, and look at the positive side before the daylight come where we know so will the destruction of bushfires.

The northern edge of the Canberra Bushfires moving from Tharwa to Corin Forest

The Figures Are IN, How Much Did We Make??

Last weekend I once again was the official photographer at the annual STOMP charity dance event and as always it was both an amazing group of people that put together an amazing show for the people that attend.

For those of you that don’t know what I am talking about, STOMP was the brainchild of a gentleman named Mark McEwen created after the tsunami on boxing bay in 2004 with the first STOMP in 2005 where it raised money for the fishing boars in a small Sri Lankan fishing village that was wiped out.

STOMP is one of Canberra premiere Latin charity dance events, raising over 100$ for local charities and bringing together the dance community. It is held at the Albert Hall near the Australian Parliament House in Canberra with a yearly theme. This year it was cosplay and the performers didn’t disappoint.

It initially started out as an Adhoc event but has since transformed into one of Canberra premiere annual Latin dance event. For more information about their history check this link out.

STOMP is one of Canberra premiere Latin charity dance events, raising over 100$ for local charities and bringing together the dance community. It is held at the Albert Hall near the Australian Parliament House in Canberra with a yearly theme. This year it was cosplay and the performers didn’t disappoint.

Since that time STOMP has raised over $150,000 towards their selected charities, here each year they select a few different charities to sponsor. One of the main charities they do sponsor is the local Rotary group with most of the money raised going to them.

One of the great things for me as a photographer is that each year has a theme and EVERYONE dresses up in that theme, which I must say is very unique given people come from over 300km away to be there and a range of locals. I can only put it down to that because this is a dance event that the dance community just love to dress up and they are super supportive of each other and enjoy being a bit flamboyant. Either way its always a surprise of what theme the will come up with and something that I always look forward to photographing and being part of.

STOMP is one of Canberra premiere Latin charity dance events, raising over 100$ for local charities and bringing together the dance community. It is held at the Albert Hall near the Australian Parliament House in Canberra with a yearly theme. This year it was cosplay and the performers didn’t disappoint.

The event typically runs where people show up at around 6:30 pm to relax with a few drinks from the bar and find their seats. They have about 1 hour of dance performances which are performed by dance studios both from there and Sydney which I think is just amazing. After the performances, they clear the hall and set up two rooms each with their different theme where people can move around as they see fit. Each room has its own personal DJ with the main hall having all sorts of cool lighting that brings out the heritage-listed architecture of the building.

STOMP is one of Canberra premiere Latin charity dance events, raising over 100$ for local charities and bringing together the dance community. It is held at the Albert Hall near the Australian Parliament House in Canberra with a yearly theme. This year it was cosplay and the performers didn’t disappoint.

I am not sure what the thinking is behind each performance but what I can say having seen many years of them, they are always just amazing. Its a mixture of both professional and beginners that want to just have a go and perform for the pleasure of others.

STOMP is one of Canberra premiere Latin charity dance events, raising over 100$ for local charities and bringing together the dance community. It is held at the Albert Hall near the Australian Parliament House in Canberra with a yearly theme. This year it was cosplay and the performers didn’t disappoint.

One of the great things I love about STOMP is the people…. The people that give up so much of their time to support and give back to others. While I have been photographed all sorts of dance the Latin dance (not be be confused with Latin that is related to ballroom) is the most open and friendly of them all. They give back and in all the years of photographing this style, I have never, ever heard anyone be bitchy or backstab anyone which unfortunately is rare given I have sooo much all-access to all-areas I hear a lot of things. Not from these people.

Most of the night is filled with social dancing and a great chance for me to capture people interacting without them knowing I am there so they are more natural than any staged shoot I could ever do. 🙂

STOMP is one of Canberra premiere Latin charity dance events, raising over 100$ for local charities and bringing together the dance community. It is held at the Albert Hall near the Australian Parliament House in Canberra with a yearly theme. This year it was cosplay and the performers didn’t disappoint.

All in all, it was a fantastic night.

So the figures are in and for that night they raised $10,600 which an amazing feat. Here are their official results
Pets In The Park ($2,120 / 20% of funds). 
Kelvin Davies 4 the Rainforest ($2,120 / 20% of funds)
Karinya House ($2,120 / 20% of funds)
* Rotary Club of Canberra Burley Griffin local community programs ($4,240 / 40% of funds).

If you want more information about the event you can touch base from their facebook page their website

I do have a special mention is to 303 Industries where they come up with a white backdrop allowing them to project all sorts of lighting stuff on there. Truly a great idea and it really worked as you can see.

STOMP is one of Canberra premiere Latin charity dance events, raising over 100$ for local charities and bringing together the dance community. It is held at the Albert Hall near the Australian Parliament House in Canberra with a yearly theme. This year it was cosplay and the performers didn’t disappoint.

While his website sucks arse the ability to light up a room in a special way is just fantastic. Here is some of his work of his website and in that page, you can see a link to the background and lighting I am talking about. NOTE: If you look closely at the super bright moon in the middle it’s my bald head reflecting off the light. hahahahaha

As I do at the end of every STOMP I look forward to next year. 🙂

If you want to see my other posts about STOMP you can find them here

And The Best Dressed Award Goes To!!!!!

Every year I am invited back to photograph the Canberra elite public and private companies in the computer-related industries as they fight to win the top prizes at the iAwards.

This event is a combination of cocktails drinks, gala dinner and awards ceremony with a splash of being a convention with a hand full of lucky providers being able to show their wares at the back of the main dining hall.

It is an event like no other in the ICT space here in Australia as it is across the entire country with the local winners going on to the National awards in Melbourne later in the year.

For me, it is an event that I look forward to every year for a few reasons. Other than it being a very formal black tie event I get a fly on the walls insight in the trends and future of ICT here in Australia and has been shooting for the AIIA for maybe 6 years I have seen the growth and effects winning such an award has had on their business and their ability to grow and take their business to another level.

Every year like all the other gathering where they have a keynote speaker I get to meet and learn a lot about what is going on. A few years ago we had the artificial intelligent professor, they have had the owner and founder of AIE and as with almost every year, we have had government representatives to give their vision and support to the ICT industries.

This year was no exception with the none other Mr Andrew Barr MLA and Chief Minister for the Canberra there to support the ICT industry, and this not being his first time to this event and I doubt it will be his last.

Mr Andrew Barr MLA and Chief Minister for the Canberra

All in all it was another great night and great to see so many people involved and to hear the stories of what they are working on and what the future holds in terms of ICT.

WOW look at how cool that room looks at the iAwards Canberra 2019 held at the National Art Gallery of Australia

I personally can’t wait until next year to see what other amazing things the switched on ICT industry comes up with. 🙂

The live music was also fantastic

Leader Of The Pack!

Last weekend I attended the Bulldog fun day at held at the Tuggeranong Dog Club where they had 60+ dogs and owner show up to enjoy the fantastic weather and hang with other like minded people, not to metnion participate in some fun competion and win a few things on the raffles.

Was great to see soo many bulldog in one place and TBH never really spent much time with this breed before so it was intergesting to see how they interacted with each other and their owners.

Look at this little pup. Looking proud as punch and ready to take on the world even at 1 foot tall. lol

If Only I Was a Real Sized Dog..

Where was also best dressed which this little chap won hands down in his custom x-mas sled. Ho Ho Ho

All in all a great day out but didn’t my legs know about it the next day as I must have done about 8,374,227 squats so I could get down low to photograph the dog, but hey… Whoever said photography wasn’t good for your health. 😉

What A Way To Die!!!

Had a chance to catch up with Tim The Yowie Man over the weekend to photograph the screening of his YouTube serires “The Tragedy of Henry Dunkley” latest part in his web series of documentary-style YouTube videos.

I have photographed some of the behind the scenes of his events and YouTuseriesres and seeing the end product of his and his teams latest editioin I was very much impressed with how far they have come. The clearly have learnt a lot from their past effort as this was a as sweet as nectar in what they produced from the first to this one.

23rd March 2019 – Gunning, NSW Australia. Tim the Yowie man and crew at their screening of The Tragedy of Henry Dunkley

Without giving much away, its a real-life tale of murder, lovers and strange execution.

Tim and his production crew had their screening out a place called Pyer Cottage in Gunning NSW which is close to where the real events took place but given the cottage is a historical cottage it was used in the filming of “The Tragedy of Henry Dunkley”.

While I have been out to Gunning a few times as it is a fantastic place to ride your motorcycle and the cafe there is just the best with some fantastic scones and coffee, I didn’t until the weekend know the cottage was there which BTW is now turned into a museum.

Then after watching the screening of “The Tragedy of Henry Dunkley” I had a new outlook on this little country town and had an urge to go to the sewage works….. Oh, you will have to watch “The Tragedy of Henry Dunkley” to see why. lol


The Pye Cottage – Gunning NSW Australia
Inside the Pye Cottage – Gunning NSW Australia
Inside the Pye Cottage – Gunning NSW Australia
Inside the Pye Cottage – Gunning NSW Australia
23rd March 2019 – Gunning, NSW Australia. Tim the yowie man and crew at their screening of The Tragedy of Henry Dunkley

Given it the screening was at Gunning there was a great turnout with a bush fire control center filled to standing room only and as I stood at the front of the room watching and photographing their faces I could just tell the were fixed to the screen to see how the story played out.

Eyes locked to the screens

After the great viewing, the night ended with a few speaches a feed put on by the local “The Old Hume Cafe”. Me being me mentioned it was a bit posh but I was assured that this was just normal Gunning hospitality. Not sure if I believed it with things like this put out for us to eat.

Great spread of food put on by “The old Hume Cafe”

There was a few locals there selling some of the books that were the drivers for Tim’s episode which I would have loved to buy however as I was on the motorbike I wasn’t in a position to take extra things home as I was already full taking 2 x Canon 5D iv, two lenses and a speedlite on my back. lol

Tim The Yowie Man giving some more background on the series and other facts in and around the Gunning area.

All in all a great night and great viewing.

If you want more information here are some links for you to follow.

Tim The Yowie Man YouTube Video – Make sure you click on and subscribe to his channel.

Gunning & District Historical Society –
https://gunninghistory.blogspot.com/

The Old Hume Cafe
https://www.facebook.com/TheOldHumeCafe/

Love and Live

The most amazing thing I do as a photographer is to take photos of life experiences, to capture memories, to take a fraction in time of our lives and put it in a still photograph.

Over the years I take photos of people that have been the last photos anyone has taken of them while they are alive.

Please do not let me be that person…… More importantly, don’t make the last word you say to someone be bad or hateful, don’t make the last word of feeling you have for someone be with hate, don’t let the last word you tell someone be one that is bitter and regrets.

Life my friends is sooooooooo short…. Love with an open heart, love without regret and love like there is no tomorrow as there may not be any tomorrow.

Love Your Friends
Dance Like No One Is Watching

Sometimes It’s Nice To Relax!

It’s been a busy first month of the year for me in lots of areas of my life and with things starting to seattle down and get in to a new rythym it’t nice to relax, and take in the things that life has to offer.

Taking the time to have a look around and appreciate all the things, and people that are around you and what all that means.

For me to be able to look out over this sunset almost every day is one of the very special things in my life and a decission to buy and keep this house is a decission that I will also appreciate.

Its my home, its my santurary, its the place where I raised my daughter, a place where I spent many years of my life through dark and sunny days and a place that I will call home for the unforseable future.

The fact that you are reading this means a lot to me. You have taken time out of your life to be part of mine even if it may be through the writing of this. So thank you. <3

Sun Set From My Back Deck

What An Amazing Weekend!

The weekend away was full of fun and excitement in such amazing scenery that I cannot comprehend.
The strangest part of the weekend is that we are in a drought, and the lakes and the dams which we visited are amazingly low. While in North Queensland around Townsville they have had over a metre of rain in the last five days.
Here is a photo took at blowering reserve some hundred kilometres west of Canberra.
As you can see the dam is really green, the water levels are extremely low and the fact that is green means that the water levels have been so low for such a long time the vegetation has grown says a lot.
I have a heap of photos which I want to share and will I guess I’ll have to space out over a few days so I dont bore shitless, so here is the first of the ones which I took.
Hope you enjoy them and let me know what you think.

Boy I Have A Really Good Mate!

A good mate of mine recently went to New Zealand on a family holiday and being a great mate he brought me back a great prop…. So what else do you do with a good prop…

Thanks Steve <3

Photograph it of course. lol

The Best Prop
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