WOW, what a change!

Australia has been ravaged by fires for months and anyone has followed me for a while knows that I go along and take photos from the roof of my house.

The other day I captured this photo and while it’s not the most amazing photo you will ever see it did make think and understand the power of photography.

This photo to me represents the idea that we are back to a normal, normal before fires and a normal before the summer heat. Sitting in my roof taking this photo took them back to many places and many times I’ve had on my roof with friends and family enjoying the scenery.

I guess the point I’m getting at here is that photography and photographs capture a point in time and they capture an emotion in time. For me looking at this view brings back feelings of friendship, love and well-being.

What feelings do your photos bring back to you?

New Life

With every dark night, there is a sunny day. With every sad day, there is a day of happiness. With every broken heart, there is love. With every great photo, there are 8,498,094 shit ones. hahahahaha

The amazing thing about the Australian bushland is that it has the ability to rebuild after fires and in fact a lot of our flora require it.

Walking through the burnt lands and national parks what was amazing was how fast some of the plants have not only survived but even after being completely burnt have comeback.

What you will notice in these photos is that the leaves and grass have also come back and these photos were taken maybe 3 weeks after the fire has passed through this area.

Ferns coming back after the 2020 bushfires

I saw hundreds of ferns that have at least 30cm of new growth and littered the hills of the burnt-out wasteland where I would have thought all life would have been extinguished just like the fires had.

Tree coming back after the 2020 bushfires
Ferns coming back after the 2020 bushfires
Ferns coming back after the 2020 bushfires
Ferns coming back after the 2020 bushfires

They Are Here To Kill, You Need To Help!

The bushfires across Australia have wiped out a shit load of our bush but what is worse than the trees is the wildlife that has been either killed or wiped off the face of the earth in many areas.

Any animals that did survive the bushfires had either run away from it, hid while it passed or doubled back on the fire as it burnt. As you can imagine any animal going back into the burnt fire ground there would be slim pickings in regards to food and what is worse for a lot of animals they rely on the cover of the bush to hide from feral animals, like foxes, cats and dogs.

Spending a few days in the burnt landscape I only saw one wallaby that was jumping through the grounds for what I could only imagine was in a hunt for food.

Driving down one of the roads we came across a feral dog that was walking along the road, the dog looked like it hadn’t eaten in weeks given the exposure of the hips and ribs, not to mention it was keen to travel the roads and come up to cars looking for food.

While the dog was in distress what crossed my mind was the image of the wallaby and all the other vulnerable animals coming back into these areas where these predators would be waiting.

What can you do to help to protect our vulnerable wildlife while it tries to recover?

I guess the first thing I would say it so keep any of your pets inside so they do not venture out into these areas for an easy feed.

The other idea I would think is that if you do see these feral animals in vulnerable areas that you contact the national parks wildlife service to let them know so they can deal with, or if you are licenced to do so, take some time over the coming month to go to these area and concentrate on ferals that are taking advantage of our vulnerable wildlife.

Feral Dog looking for prey after the Australian Bushfires
Feral Dog looking for prey after the Australian Bushfires

Total Destruction and Houses Saved

Spending a few days travelling up and down the bush fire-ravaged area of the Australian south coast of New South Wales sprinkle some money it was hard to not be freaked out by the destruction the fires have had in that part of the Australian, where I am sure it a scene that has been replicated all over Australian bushfires in the last few months.

There is kilometre after kilometre of burnt national parks, reserves, and farmland.  In some places the destruction is so bad that there is nothing left on the ground, the bushes that may have been there before the fires are completely gone and so is any ash from which they would have ultimately turned into. 

The landscape in some parts looks like the back of a balding echidna, with what were once filled with healthy trees and bush, it now looks like quills that are also so sparse that you can clearly see the landscape they once protected. 

Stopping at one place to have a look around, what struck me was the complete silence.   There were no sounds….  Like none….  No birds, no wind, no leaves, not anything… like there was nothing…  It was both surreal and relaxing at the same time.

The other thing that I took away from looking at hundreds of kilometres of burnt-out land was the incredibly high percentage of houses that survived even while everything was burnt around them.  Their fences were gone, gates were gone, trees around them were gone but the houses looked untouched.  House after house, as I drove up and down the south coast, was like this.  With everyone I saw it was hard to figure out how they were not touched, I know the RFS would have been there for some and residents were there for others but I am sure good old fashion good luck played a very valuable role for most.

Some, on the other hand, was not that lucky.

Aerial view of a house and property that was destroyed in the 2020 bush fires near Nowra
Aerial view of a house and property that was destroyed in the 2020 bush fires near Nowra
The landscape is just sticks after the bushfire
The landscape is just sticks after the bushfire
A burnt-out car on a property surrounded by national park
A burnt-out car on a property surrounded by national park
A burnt-out boat next to a shed on a property that was destroyed by the bushfires
A burnt-out boat next to a shed on a property that was destroyed by the bushfires
A sign marking the T intersection that has seen better times after the bushfires
A sign marking the T intersection that has seen better times after the bushfires
No that is not a tank but an expensive burnt-out boat from the bushfires
No that is not a tank but an expensive burnt-out boat.
burnt-t car from the 2020 bushfires
At least the headlights sort of made it through
Kilometre after kilometre of bushfire ravaged national parks
Kilometre after kilometre of bushfire ravaged national parks
Jerrawangala National Park sign that was burnt in the 2020 bushfires
Maybe not the best national park to visit at this moment in time.